CIPR | Center For Inter-American Policy & Research

Tulane University

Immigration, Latinos and 2016 Elections, CIPR Event Summary

On Friday, October 14, 2016, the Center of Inter-American Policy and Research (CIPR) hosted a panel to discuss immigration, Latinos, and the upcoming presidential elections. Dr. Louis DeSipio (UC Irvine), Dr. Jennifer Merolla (UC Riverside), and Tom Wong (UC San Diego), presented their research and explained what their findings could mean for the upcoming election.
Dr. DeSipio presented research showing that immigration has become more salient in the American political arena due to increased immigration, greater activism within immigrant communities, and a growing native backlash against high levels of immigration. However, despite this rising salience, increased political polarization over the past 30 years has decreased the chances of comprehensive immigration reform.
Dr. Merolla presented work from her book Framing Immigrants: News Coverage, Public Opinion and Policy (Russell Sage, 2016). Along with her co-authors, Chris Haynes and S. Karthick Ramakrishnan, this work explores the seemingly conflicting views the public has on immigration.
For example, polls have shown that while a majority of people supported President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a majority of people also supported Arizona’s restrictive immigration law passed in 2010. Their findings indicate that how an issue is framed noticeably influences how that issue is perceived.
Dr. Wong spoke to the current political environment and discussed current Latino electoral participation and how “get out the vote” efforts influence voters. Arguing that while even a heated political environment may not increase voter turn out, preliminary research showed that utilizing phone-canvassing scripts that emphasize certain messages over others can actually increase participation.
Overall, this panel brought together scholars and researchers from both the Tulane and wider academic communities. CIPR looks forward to continuing the discussion of this important issue on campus and encouraging further collaboration and research in the role immigration and immigrant communities play in the US political system.

For more information about this topic, please consult the most recent works by our panelists:
Jennifer Merolla, Chris Haynes and S. Karthick Ramakrishnan (2016) Framing Immigrants: News Coverage, Public Opinion and Policy.
Louis Desipio and Rodolfo O. de la Garza (2015) U.S. Immigration in the Twenty-First Century: Making Americans, Remaking America.
Tom Wong (forthcoming, 2016) The Politics of Immigration: Partisanship, Demographic Change, and American National Identity.&

This panel was organized by CIPR post-doctoral fellow Rachel Navarre

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Upcoming Events

The Latin American Library's Annual Open House

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The Latin American Library will be hosting its annual open house event on Friday, September 21. This annual event will welcome back faculty, students, staff, and friends from the New Orleans community. The event will include a talk by Colombian visual artist Erika Diettes, an exhibit of recent acquisitions, a book sale, and as always much more!

The event is free and open to the public.

For more information contact Madeline White via email (mwhite7@tulane.edu) or by phone at (504) 865-5681.

Equity speaker series to host panel on navigating immigrant relations in the current political climate

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The Center for Academic Equity at Tulane University is proud to present Border Li(n)es: Excluding, Extracting, and Expelling Immigrants in the Southern U.S. on September 25, 2018 at 7:00 PM as part of the Equity Speaker Series.

Following a summer of turbulent immigration relations in the United States, the Fall 2018 Equity Speaker Panel will focus on immigration on our Southern border and will feature specialists whose experiences vary from grassroots to professorial work. Panelists will include Josiah Heyman, Director of the Center for Inter-American and Border Studies, Ronald Martinez, New Orleans immigrant activist and spokesperson for the Congress of Day Laborers, Hiroko Kusuda, Clinical Professor and Director of Immigration Law at the Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice at Loyola, and Laila Hlass, Clinical Professor of Law at Tulane Law School and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

These four distinguished speakers will share the stage of Freeman Auditorium to discuss the drastic variation in immigrant relations across the national, regional, and local spaces and ways that members of American society may become engaged in or change the now toxic and polarized political climate. This inaugural discussion will be followed by a question and answer session.

See also Tulane New Wave for more information and a description of the event.




Cover photo from CNN story What the US-Mexico border looks like before Trump’s wall.